Program 296: Appalachian Trails

Release Date: 08-11-2012

Description

Some things haven't changed much over the years in Appalachia. Rock the cradle of country music, from kitchy Dollywood, to all-day mountain music jams along Virginia's "Crooked Road." Tony Horwitz explores how John Brown's 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry, still haunts us today. Also, we'll hear how fun it is to hike the Appalachian Trail.

Guests

  • London-based travel writer Will Hide
  • Tony Horwitz, author of "Midnight Rising" (Henry Holt and Co.)
  • Appalachian Trail hiker Albert Dragon, author of "Avalanche and Gorilla Jim" (Morgan James Publishing)

Related Links

  • Will Hide writes about his road trip into the hollers of "old-time" Americana and country music on the BBC's Lonely Planet website. 
  • There are performances of bluegrass, gospel, and "old time" music at the Floyd Country Store near the Blue Ridge Parkway in southwest Virginia on Friday nights, Saturday and Sunday afternoons, and on other special occasions.
  • The Blue Ridge Music Center is at mile 213 of the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia, near the North Carolina border.  It hosts old time music performers, concerts, and has an impressive exhibit about the roots of country, blues, and traditional American music.
  • Virginia Tourism includes music listings and an interactive map to help explore the sites and heritage of traditional mountain music on the region's two-lane roads, which they've dubbed "The Crooked Road."
  • Rick enjoyed a visit to Layla's Bluegrass Inn in Nashville.
  • Tony Horwitz's website includes information about his book on John Brown's raid, "Midnight Rising."
  • There is a short video about Tony Horwitz' "Midnight Rising."
  • The historic town of Harper's Ferry, West Virginia, is a national park. The Appalachian Trail runs through the area. The National Park Service has an extensive website with information about attractions in the tri-state Harper's Ferry area. The C & O Canal Towpath serves as a bike trail to the nearby Antietam civil war battlefield.
  • Wikipedia includes an entry about abolitionist John Brown
  • West Virginia Public Broadcasting created a 47-minute documentary about "John Brown's Body."
  • Albert Dragon's website includes excerpts from his book "Avalanche and Gorilla Jim," videos of his presentations about hiking the Appalachian Trail, and a contest for "what's funny about hiking?"  
  • The website of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.
  • The Appalachian Trail is celebrating its 75th anniversary on August 14, 2012.