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Program 565: 'Greatest Treasure Hunt'; 100 Things to Do in San Francisco

Release Date: 05-25-2019

Description

The founder of the Monuments Men Foundation joins us to consider what the world would be like had the Mona Lisa or Michelangelo's David been destroyed in World War II, and describes the work of the team who took heroic steps to protect Europe's art treasures from wartime damage and Nazi theft. Then a guidebook author shares tips for enjoying the rainbow of attractions, flavors, and summer festivals that make San Francisco a perpetually exciting place to visit.

Guests

  • Robert Edsel, founder of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of "The Greatest Treasure Hunt in History" (Scholastic Focus)
  • Kimberley Lovato, co-author of "100 Things To Do In San Francisco Before You Die" (Reedy Press)

Additional Info

  • Robert Edsel of the Monuments Men Foundation pays tribute to one of the original Monuments Men, Harry Ettlinger, who passed away in October 2018.  Mr. Ettlingler joined us from his home in New Jersey on Travel with Rick Steves program #235 in February 2011.   
  • Robert Edsel also discussed the work of the Monuments Men and the Monuments Men Foundation on Travel with Rick Steves program #264 in 2011, and on program #186 in 2009.
  • Robert Edsel's latest book about the work of the Monuments Men, during and after the Second World War, is aimed at younger readers, and is called "The Greatest Treasure Hunt in History."
  • The tip line phone number for the Monuments Men Foundation is 1-866-99-44-278 (1-866-WWII-ART). Their website includes a list, with photos, of artworks that remain missing since World War Two.   
  • The National World War Two Museum in New Orleans will have a permanent exhibit on the Monuments Men in its new Liberation Pavilion, due to open in 2021.
  • Kimberley Lovato is co-author of "100 Things to Do in San Francisco Before You Die."
  • Off the Grid features food trucks on Sunday afternoons on the main lawn at the Presidio, on Friday evenings at Fort Mason Center, and at many other San Francisco locations throughout the week.
  • The Exploratorium looks at science, art and human perception, from its location on the Embarcadero in San Francisco.